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Feature: 6 endangered marine animals you might not know

Fri, 2022-05-20 11:34
Feature: 6 endangered marine animals you might not know False killer whale jumping out of the water in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. (Jim Cotton) May 20, 2022

 

 

 

Fisheries endangered species 0

NOAA Fisheries releases flagship reports: Status of Stocks, Fisheries of the U.S.

Wed, 2022-05-18 12:09
NOAA Fisheries releases flagship reports: Status of Stocks, Fisheries of the U.S. A digital artwork of a school of yellowfin tuna fish in the Atlantic Ocean used on the cover of the 2021 Status of the Stocks Report released by NOAA. (Getty images) May 18, 2022

 

 

 

Fisheries 0

NOAA ships and planes trading cards: Collect them all!

Wed, 2022-05-18 11:09
NOAA ships and planes trading cards: Collect them all!

NOAA’s work to understand our dynamic planet often involves sending people into the atmosphere and out to sea to conduct important research. From “Hurricane Hunter” aircraft that pilots fly directly into hurricanes to fisheries survey vessels that run quietly to avoid disturbing marine life, the Office of Marine and Aviation Operations maintains and operates a fleet of specialized research vessels and aircraft

Get to know NOAA’s ships and planes with these virtual trading cards! 

Print NOAA ships and planes trading cards at home (PDF, 22 MB)

Planes Beechcraft King Air 350CER Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

These planes support coastal mapping, snow surveys, and emergency response.

  • Length: 46 feet, 8 inches.
  • Max airspeed: 282 miles per hour.
  • Wingspan: 57 feet, 11 inches.
  • Empty weight: 10,567 pounds.
Fun fact!

These planes can remain airborne for 7-8 hours. Learn more about the Beechcraft King Air 350CER.

De Havilland DHC-6-300 Twin Otter Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

These planes support marine mammal, coastal mapping, and snow surveys.

  • Length: 51 feet, 9 inches.
  • Max airspeed: 172 miles per hour.
  • Wingspan: 65 feet.
  • Empty weight: 8,100 pounds. 
Fun fact!

These planes can cover over 600 nautical miles of survey in a single fuel load. Learn more about the De Havilland DHC-6-300 Twin Otters

Gulfstream IV-SP Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This plane collects data for hurricane research and forecasts, atmospheric studies, and more to support National Hurricane Center forecasts.

  • Length: 87 feet, 7 inches.
  • Max airspeed: 529 miles per hour.
  • Wingspan: 77 feet, 10 inches.
  • Empty weight: 43,700 pounds. 
Fun fact!

This plane has a range of nearly 4,000 nautical miles and a cruising altitude of 45,000 feet. Learn more about the Gulfstream IV-SP

Lockheed WP-3D Orion Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

These planes are “Hurricane Hunters” that collect data for hurricane and tropical storm research and forecasting.

  • Length: 116 feet, 10 inches.
  • Max airspeed: 287 miles per hour.
  • Wingspan: 99 feet, 8 inches.
  • Empty weight: 73,000 pounds. 
Fun fact!

These planes are among the largest within the Office of Marine and Aviation Operations fleet. Learn more about the Lockheed WP-3D Orion aircraft

Ships Bell M. Shimada Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship is used to study marine life, sea birds, and ocean conditions along the U.S. West Coast.

  • Home port: Newport, OR.
  • Commission date: August 25, 2010.
  • Length: 208.6 feet.
  • Areas of operation: Pacific Ocean.
Fun fact!

This ship was designed to run quietly as to not disturb fish and marine mammals during research studies. Learn more about NOAA Ship Bell M. Shimada.

Fairweather Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship maps the ocean to support safe navigation and commerce. It also collects data for ocean research projects.

  • Home port: Ketchikan, AK.
  • Commission date: April 10, 1968.
  • Length: 231 feet.
  • Areas of operation: Pacific Ocean. 
Fun fact!

This ship celebrated 50 years of service with NOAA in 2018 and is named after Mt. Fairweather in Alaska. Learn more about NOAA Ship Fairweather

Ferdinand R. Hassler Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship scans the sea floor for hazards, measures water depth, and maps features like underwater mountains and canyons.

  • Home port: New Castle, NH.
  • Commission date: June 8, 2012.
  • Length: 122.87 feet.
  • Areas of operation: Atlantic, Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico. 
Fun fact!

This ship was used following Hurricane Matthew in 2016 to detect underwater hazards from the storm. Learn more about NOAA Ship Ferdinand R. Hassler.

Gordon Gunter Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship collects fisheries data by stern trawling, longlining, and the deployment of plankton nets and other types of gear.

  • Home port: Pascagoula, MS.
  • Commission date: August 28, 1998.
  • Length: 224 feet.
  • Areas of operation: Atlantic, Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico. 
Fun fact!

This ship is named after Dr. Gordon Gunter, whose career as a marine biologist and leader in marine research and education spanned over 60 years. Learn more about NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter

Henry B. Bigelow Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship is used to study and monitor fish stocks, conduct habitat assessments, and survey marine mammal and seabird populations.

  • Home port: Newport, RI.
  • Commission date: July 16, 2007.
  • Length: 208.6 feet.
  • Areas of operation: North Atlantic. 
Fun fact!

The ship traveled over 23,500 miles in 2019. Learn more about NOAA Ship Henry B. Bigelow. 

Nancy Foster Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship supports fish habitat and population studies as well as seafloor mapping surveys.

  • Home port: Charleston, SC.
  • Commission date: May 10, 2004.
  • Length: 187 feet.
  • Areas of operation: Atlantic, Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico. 
Fun fact!

This ship was named for Dr. Nancy Foster, who led several NOAA programs to explore, map, protect, and sustainably develop coastal and fishery resources. Learn more about NOAA Ship Nancy Foster

Okeanos Explorer Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship explores the sea for shipwrecks, new marine species, and other features of our largely unexplored ocean.

  • Home port: Newport, RI.
  • Commission date: August 13, 2008.
  • Length: 224 feet.
  • Areas of operation: Global, International. 
Fun fact!

This ship has a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) and video system that allows viewers on shore to follow expeditions live. Learn more about NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer

Oregon II Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship conducts a variety of fisheries plankton, and marine mammal surveys.

  • Home port: Pascagoula, MS.
  • Commission date: March 12, 1975.
  • Length: 170 feet.
  • Areas of operation: Atlantic, Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico. 
Fun fact!

This ship has conducted an annual longline red snapper and shark survey since 1995. Learn more about NOAA Ship Oregon II

Oscar Dyson Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship collects data on fish populations, conducts marine and seabird surveys, and studies marine ecosystems.

  • Home port: Kodiak, AK.
  • Commission date: May 28, 2005.
  • Length: 208.6 feet.
  • Areas of operation: Pacific Ocean. 
Fun fact!

This ship is an ultra-quiet fisheries survey vessel that operates in the most delicate marine environments without disturbing the ecosystem. Learn more about NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson

Oscar Elton Sette Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship conducts fisheries assessments, physical and chemical oceanography research, and marine debris and mammal surveys.

  • Home port: Honolulu, HI.
  • Commission date: 1992.
  • Length: 224 feet.
  • Areas of operation: Pacific Ocean. 
Fun fact!

This ship is equipped with computer laboratories onboard. Learn more about NOAA Ship Oscar Elton Sette

Pisces Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship assists in a wide range of living marine resource surveys and ecosystem research projects.

  • Home port: Pascagoula, MS.
  • Commission date: 2009.
  • Length: 208 feet.
  • Areas of operation: Atlantic, Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico. 
Fun fact!

This ship was selected as the NOAA Marine Operations Ship of the Year in 2018. Learn more about NOAA Ship Pisces

Rainier Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship maps the ocean to improve maritime commerce and coastal resilience as well as 
maintain NOAA’s nautical charts.

  • Home port: Newport, OR.
  • Commission date: October, 1968.
  • Length: 231 feet.
  • Areas of operation: Pacific Ocean. 
Fun fact!

This ship’s side-scan sonar collects imagery of the sea floor, which can identify obstructions or wrecks that could be navigational hazards. Learn more about NOAA Ship Rainier

Reuben Lasker Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship supports fish, marine mammal, seabird, and turtle surveys in the tropical Pacific Ocean and Alaska.

  • Home port: San Diego, CA.
  • Commission date: May 2, 2014.
  • Length: 208.7 feet.
  • Areas of operation: Pacific Ocean. 
Fun fact!

This ship has a dynamic positioning system to steer along a predetermined trackline and accurately hold the ship in a fixed position. Learn more about NOAA Ship Reuben Lasker

Ronald H. Brown Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship’s sampling capability allows scientists to observe dynamics that affect climate and global weather patterns.

  • Home port: Charleston, SC.
  • Commission date: July 19, 1997.
  • Length: 274 feet.
  • Areas of operation: Global, International. 
Fun fact!

This global-class vessel is the largest in the NOAA fleet. Learn more about NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown

Thomas Jefferson Previous Slider Item Front Back Next Slider Item About

This ship has sonar technology that collects images of the seafloor to identify underwater obstructions or shipwrecks.

  • Home port: Norfolk, VA.
  • Commission date: July 8, 2003.
  • Length: 208 feet.
  • Areas of operation: Atlantic, Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico. 
Fun fact!

This ship traveled to Puerto Rico to identify submerged hazards after Hurricane Maria. Learn more about NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson

Education Marine & Aviation 1 0

NOAA predicts a below-normal 2022 Central Pacific hurricane season

Tue, 2022-05-17 12:49
NOAA predicts a below-normal 2022 Central Pacific hurricane season UPDATED: May 19, 2022. Correction to photo caption: When reanalyzing storm data for Hurricane Linda and Felicia, forecasters concluded both were post-tropical before crossing into the Central Pacific Ocean. Therefore, there was only one Tropical Cyclone (Jimena) in the Central Pacific Ocean last year. May 18, 2022 Major Hurricane Linda in the eastern Pacific Ocean on August 14, 2021, captured by NOAA’s GOES-West satellite. Linda weakened to a post-tropical low and brought heavy rain and gusty winds to portions of the main Hawaiian Islands. (NOAA) Download Image

There is a 60% chance of below-normal tropical cyclone activity during the Central Pacific hurricane season this year, according to NOAA’s Central Pacific Hurricane Center and NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, divisions of the National Weather Service. The outlook also indicates a 30% chance for near-normal activity, and only a 10% chance of an above-normal season. 

For the season as a whole, 2 to 4 tropical cyclones are predicted for the Central Pacific hurricane region, which is located north of the equator between 140°W and the International Date Line. This number includes tropical depressions, named storms and hurricanes. A near-normal season has 4 or 5 tropical cyclones. 

“This year we are predicting less activity in the Central Pacific region compared to normal seasons,” said Matthew Rosencrans, NOAA’s lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at the Climate Prediction Center. “The ongoing La Niña is likely to cause strong vertical wind shear making it more difficult for hurricanes to develop or move into the Central Pacific Ocean.”  

This outlook is a general guide to the overall seasonal tropical cyclone activity in the Central Pacific basin, and does not predict whether, or how many, of these systems will affect Hawaii. The Central Pacific hurricane season begins June 1 and runs through November 30.

“Hurricane Iniki, a major hurricane, directly hit Kauai 30 years ago this year, and those impacted still remember the incredible destructive power Iniki delivered,” said Chris Brenchley, director of NOAA’s Central Pacific Hurricane Center. “Throughout the state of Hawaii, we must take note that the possibility of a hurricane in these islands is real. Heed the advice of public safety officials. Make a preparedness plan, and communicate it to your friends and family. Together, we can make our communities more weather ready and resilient.”  

The Central Pacific Hurricane Center continuously monitors weather conditions, employing a network of satellites, land- and ocean-based sensors and aircraft reconnaissance missions operated by NOAA and its partners. This array of data supplies the information for complex computer modeling and human expertise, which are the basis for the Center’s storm track and intensity forecasts. These forecasts are made available to the public and media, and help provide critical decision support services to emergency managers at the federal, state and county levels. 

New observations and improvements 

NOAA’s fleet of earth-observing satellites grew more robust than ever with the successful launch of the GOES-18 satellite in March. This satellite will be used by forecasters to track and forecast tropical cyclones and other storms in the Pacific Ocean. 

This summer, NOAA will triple its operational supercomputing capacity for weather and climate, allowing for more detailed, higher-resolution Earth models that can handle larger ensembles, advanced physics and improved data assimilation. This massive boost along with better science will allow for forecast model upgrades for years to come.  

Check the Central Pacific Hurricane Center’s website throughout the season to stay on top of any watches and warnings, and visit FEMA’s Ready.gov for additional hurricane preparedness tips. 

 

Media contact

John Bravender, National Weather Service, john.bravender@noaa.gov, (808) 973-5275

Weather tropical cyclones hurricanes hurricane season 0

NOAA requests proposals for design and construction of new ocean survey ships

Tue, 2022-05-17 11:03
NOAA requests proposals for design and construction of new ocean survey ships May 19, 2022 Discoverer will have the ability to deploy remotely operated vehicles like this one to explore the ocean. (NOAA) Download Image

NOAA is seeking proposals from U.S. shipbuilders for the design and construction of new ships for the agency. The new vessels will primarily support NOAA’s coastal, continental shelf and deep ocean data collection requirements.

The solicitation, which opens today and closes on August 16, 2022, is for a firm, fixed-price contract for two vessels, with options for NOAA to purchase two additional vessels of the same design. The successful bidder will be responsible for both designing and building the new ships.

“NOAA ships play a vital role in supporting safe navigation, commerce, marine resource management and ocean exploration,” said NOAA Administrator Rick Spinrad, Ph.D. “Adding new, American-built ships to the NOAA fleet will dramatically increase our ability to provide data essential for protecting lives and livelihoods and strengthening the New Blue Economy.”

To meet NOAA’s requirements, the new ships must have the capability to carry, deploy and recover multiple crewed and uncrewed vessels to support nautical charting and seafloor survey missions. They must also be able to accommodate 48 people, consisting of commissioned officers, professional civilian crew members, scientists and other personnel. NOAA has set a goal of achieving net-zero emissions for its ship fleet by 2050. To support NOAA's goal of reducing the agency's carbon footprint, the new ships must incorporate the latest technologies, including high-efficiency, environmentally-friendly EPA Tier IV diesel engines and emissions controls. 

“These new ships will be equipped with state-of-the-art ocean data collection systems that will enable us to map, chart, study and explore the ocean with unprecedented detail,” said Rear Adm. Nancy Hann, director of NOAA’s Office of Marine and Aviation Operations and the NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps.

NOAA anticipates awarding the contract for this acquisition in 2023 and taking delivery of the first two vessels by 2027. The agency has not yet assigned a homeport for these new ships.

This acquisition represents the second phase of NOAA’s ship fleet recapitalization effort. Thoma-Sea Marine Constructors in Houma, Louisiana, is currently building two new oceanographic ships for NOAA, Oceanographer and Discoverer. Those vessels are expected to join the NOAA fleet in 2025 and 2026, respectively.

NOAA’s fleet of research and survey ships is operated, managed and maintained by NOAA’s Office of Marine and Aviation Operations. NOAA ships are crewed by NOAA Corps officers and civilian professional mariners. Each year, NOAA ships collect data critical for nautical charts, sustainable fishery management, marine mammal protection, storm surge modeling, climate research and exploration of the nation’s 4.3-million-square-mile Exclusive Economic Zone.

Media contact

David Halldavid.l.hall@noaa.gov, ?(240) 622-5870

Marine & Aviation surveys NOAA ships 0

Q&A with Acting NWS Director Mary Erickson

Mon, 2022-05-16 13:30
Q&A with Acting NWS Director Mary Erickson Mary C. Erickson, Acting Director of the National Weather Service (NOAA) Download Image May 16, 2022

 

 

 

Weather STEM 0

Story map: In Hot Water: Ocean Heat and Our Warming World

Mon, 2022-05-16 11:37
Story map: In Hot Water: Ocean Heat and Our Warming World Sunset over the ocean. (Istock) Download Image January 17, 2022

   

Climate Story maps ocean global warming 0

Story map: In harm’s way, Hurricane Ida’s impact on socially vulnerable communities

Mon, 2022-05-16 11:27
Story map: In harm’s way, Hurricane Ida’s impact on socially vulnerable communities Satellite image from NOAA’s GOES-16 of Hurricane Ida’s landfall in southeastern Louisiana around 12:01 CDT on August 29, 2021. There were an above-average number of tropical cyclones around the world in 2021, with a total of 94 named storms. (NOAA) Download Image May 16, 2022

   

Climate Story maps hurricanes heat flooding tropical storms social justice social science research coastal communities human health community engagement 0