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FCC Not Processing New License Applications

ARRL News - Thu, 2023-04-27 15:35

4/27/2022

On Wednesday, April 27, in a notice to all VECs, the FCC again asked them to refrain from submitting any amateur radio exam session or license application files while the Commission works to resolve an issue with the Universal Licensing System (ULS) application filing system.

The ULS application filing system was not functioning properly last week and then the FCC indicated the problem ...

The K7RA Solar Update

ARRL News - Mon, 2022-08-08 15:57

Solar activity continued to decline this week, with average daily sunspot number dropping from 91.1 to 36.6 and average solar flux at 95.7, down from 107.6 the week prior.

Thursday's sunspot number was above the average for the previous seven days at 52.  Solar flux on Thursday was above the previous seven day average at 108.8.  The 2300 UTC flux was 111.3.

We've not seen lower values since mid-A...

Status of Stocks Report 2021: U.S. fisheries held steady in 2021, with more than 90% of stocks not subject to overfishing and 80% not overfished.

NOAA News Releases - Mon, 2022-08-08 09:19
Status of Stocks Report 2021: U.S. fisheries held steady in 2021, with more than 90% of stocks not subject to overfishing and 80% not overfished. A digital artwork of a school of yellowfin tuna fish in the Atlantic Ocean used on the cover of the 2021 Status of the Stocks Report released by NOAA. (Getty images) August 8, 2022

 

 

 

Fisheries 0

July 2022 was third hottest on record for the U.S.

NOAA News Releases - Fri, 2022-08-05 08:25
July 2022 was third hottest on record for the U.S. Parts of the nation saw historic flooding and intensifying drought A house almost completely submerged by flood water off of the Bert T. Combs Mountain Parkway on July 29, 2022, in Breathitt County, Kentucky. (Michael Swensen/Getty Images) August 8, 2022

July 2022 will go down in the history books as the third-hottest July on record for the U.S., according to scientists from NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information.

From drought to deluge, the nation saw remarkable extremes last month. Drought conditions intensified or expanded across parts of the U.S., while others were hit by historic rainfall that led to catastrophic flooding.

Below are more takeaways from NOAA’s latest monthly U.S. climate report:

Climate by the numbers

July 2022

The average temperature across the contiguous U.S. last month was 76.4 degrees F (2.8 degrees above average), making July 2022 the third-hottest July in the 128-year climate record. Only July 1936 (first) and July 2012 (second) were hotter.

Texas felt the brunt of the heat, reporting its hottest July, May-July and April-July on record. Near-record warmth also covered locations from the Pacific Northwest to the south-central U.S., and across parts of the Northeast. Oregon had its fourth-hottest July on record, with Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Rhode Island sweltering through their top-five warmest Julys on record.

The average July precipitation was 2.74 inches (0.04 of an inch below average), ranking in the middle third of the historical record. Kentucky saw its fourth-wettest July due to record rainfall during the last week of the month. Elsewhere, Rhode Island saw its second-driest July while Texas had its fifth driest.

Year to date (January through July 2022)

The year-to-date (YTD) average temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 52.7 degrees F (1.4 degrees above the average), ranking in the warmest-third YTD on record. Temperatures were above average from Oregon to the Gulf Coast and northward to New England. California and Florida each ranked sixth warmest on record for the YTD.

The first seven months of 2022 saw an average precipitation of 16.58 inches (1.51 inches below average), which ranked in the driest third of the record. Precipitation was below average across much of the West, central Plains and Deep South for this YTD period. California had its driest January-July on record, while Nevada and Texas saw their second driest and Utah saw its fourth driest.

A map of the United States plotted with significant climate events that occurred during July 2022. Please see the story below as well as the full climate report highlights at http://bit.ly/USClimate202207 offsite link. (NOAA/NCEI) Download Image

Other notable climate events

Catastrophic flooding ravaged communities: On July 26, several locations in and around St. Louis, Missouri, received more rainfall than any other day on record. A stalled weather system combined with tropical moisture resulted in precipitation totals that rivaled daily records set by the remnants of the Galveston Hurricane of 1915. St. Louis’ Lambert International Airport reported 8.64 inches and St. Peters, Missouri, measured 12.34 inches of rain from this event. The extreme rainfall caused flash flooding, resulting in at least one fatality as well as extensive damage to homes and businesses. 

Flash flooding from the same system impacted portions of eastern Kentucky on the early morning of July 28. Heavy rain, enhanced by the hilly terrain, accumulated rapidly — trapping many residents in their homes. Four-to-eight inches of rain were widespread across eastern Kentucky and the Kentucky River crested to an all-time high in both Whitesburg and Jackson, Kentucky. The flooding resulted in at least 37 fatalities.

Drought increased in coverage and intensity: According to the August 2 U.S. Drought Monitor offsite link report, 51.4% of the contiguous U.S. was in drought, up about 3.7% from the end of June. Drought conditions expanded or intensified across portions of the Northeast, with flash drought rapidly expanding in the southern and central Plains, Ozarks and the mid-Mississippi Valley. Drought decreased or was eliminated across portions of the Southeast, Midwest, Southwest, northern Rockies as well as Alaska and Puerto Rico.

View NOAA’s latest report and download the images from the NCEI website.

 

Media contact

John Bateman, john.jones-bateman@noaa.gov, (202) 424-0929

Climate Satellites monthly climate report flooding drought heat 0

The magic of Martha's Vineyard Oysters

NOAA News Releases - Wed, 2022-08-03 13:20
The magic of Martha's Vineyard Oysters Cultured microalgae light up the education tent at Martha’s Vineyard Oyster Fest. (Emma Green-Beach, Martha’s Vineyard Shellfish Group, Inc.) Download Image July 7, 2022

July 2022 Harvest Story from Martha's Vineyard Shellfish Group

Office of Education 0

Ocean farmers: Learning together through play

NOAA News Releases - Wed, 2022-08-03 13:17
Ocean farmers: Learning together through play Playing with and sorting objects related to farming is one key activity developed through the Ocean Farmers project. Educator Jeyleen is discussing these ideas with a guest. (Aquarium of the Pacific) Download Image May 27, 2022

May 2022 Harvest Story from Aquarium of the Pacific

Office of Education CELC 0

Students carry on an important cultural and economic touchstone through oyster aquaculture

NOAA News Releases - Wed, 2022-08-03 13:15
Students carry on an important cultural and economic touchstone through oyster aquaculture OysterCorps students Elijah Mathes (left) and Morgan Smith (right) transferring oysters to larger cages during a visit to the lease, January 2022. (Todd Bracken) Download Image April 25, 2022

April 2022 Harvest Story from OysterCorps and Franklin's Promise Coalition

Office of Education CELC 0

Offshore optics: Taking a closer look at offshore aquaculture

NOAA News Releases - Wed, 2022-08-03 13:08
Offshore optics: Taking a closer look at offshore aquaculture New offshore aquaculture exhibit at Mote Marine Aquarium in Sarasota, Florida. (Danielle Mosteller, Mote Marine Aquarium) Download Image March 30, 2022

March 2022 Harvest Story from Mote Marine Lab

Office of Education CELC 0

Hands-on community learning in a socially distant world

NOAA News Releases - Wed, 2022-08-03 13:01
Hands-on community learning in a socially distant world Science teachers from Brunswick High School explore the Canopy Farms facility with hosts Kate Holcomb and Theo Willis, discussing connections to their course curriculum. (Pamela King) Download Image January 21, 2022

January 2022 Harvest Story from Canopy Farms

Office of Education CELC 0

Bringing aquaculture mainstream

NOAA News Releases - Wed, 2022-08-03 12:41
Bringing aquaculture mainstream Santa Barbara Sea Center staff toured the Cultured Abalone Farm in September 2021 to expand their knowledge of abalone aquaculture. Their goal was to learn how they can better teach aquarium visitors about large-scale aquaculture and how it is helping save the endangered white abalone. (Owen Duncan, Santa Barbara Sea Center) Download Image February 22, 2022

February 2022 Harvest Story from The Cultured Abalone Farm

Office of Education CELC 0

U.S. Postal Service releases stamps featuring NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuaries

NOAA News Releases - Wed, 2022-08-03 09:19
U.S. Postal Service releases stamps featuring NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuaries August 5, 2022 The set of 16 new National Marine Sanctuaries Forever® stamps feature scenes from NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuaries. Credit: NOAA, with images supplied by USPS.

What travels around the world but stays in one corner? With the U.S. Postal Service releasing 16 new National Marine Sanctuaries Forever® stamps, you don’t need to travel the world to appreciate America’s most spectacular marine places.

Animation showcasing the set of 16 new Forever® stamps featuring photographs of NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuaries. ? (NOAA, with images supplied by USPS)

These stamps celebrate the 50th anniversary of NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuary System, which protects a network of underwater parks encompassing more than 620,000 square miles of marine and Great Lakes waters. They showcase the abundant wildlife, scenic beauty and underwater archaeological treasures found throughout the sanctuary system. 

Originating with Monitor National Marine Sanctuary, home to the famed Civil War shipwreck USS Monitor, to the latest designation of Wisconsin Shipwreck Coast National Marine Sanctuary which protects unique Great Lakes resources, each sanctuary offers opportunities to explore and learn. 

Today, NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the U.S. Postal Service hosted a community dedication ceremony at the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Exploration Center in Santa Cruz, California, to celebrate this new stamp series. 

Learn more about the 16 new National Marine Sanctuaries Forever® stamps in the U.S. Postal Service press release offsite link


 

Ocean & Coasts sanctuaries 0

New research drones launched to improve hurricane forecasts

NOAA News Releases - Wed, 2022-08-03 07:41
New research drones launched to improve hurricane forecasts The Altius uncrewed drone is pictured with NOAA WP-3D Orion Hurricane Hunter Aircraft in the background at NOAA Aircraft Operations Center in Lakeland, Florida, on May 25, 2022. (NOAA) Download Image August 3, 2022

 

 

 

Research research drones 0

NOAA still expects above-normal Atlantic hurricane season

NOAA News Releases - Tue, 2022-08-02 08:56
NOAA still expects above-normal Atlantic hurricane season Preparedness is key during the peak months of hurricane season August 4, 2022 Collage depicts hurricane storm surge, Acting NOAA National Hurricane Center Director Jamie Rhome presenting a forecast, evacuation route sign and Hurricane Hunter pilot flying into a storm. (NOAA) Download Image

Atmospheric and oceanic conditions still favor an above-normal 2022 Atlantic hurricane season, according to NOAA’s annual mid-season update issued today by the Climate Prediction Center, a division of the National Weather Service.

“I urge everyone to remain vigilant as we enter the peak months of hurricane season,” said Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo. “The experts at NOAA will continue to provide the science, data and services needed to help communities become hurricane resilient and climate-ready for the remainder of hurricane season and beyond.”

NOAA forecasters have slightly decreased the likelihood of an above-normal Atlantic hurricane season to 60% (lowered from the outlook issued in May, which predicted a 65% chance). The likelihood of near-normal activity has risen to 30% and the chances remain at 10% for a below-normal season. 

“We’re just getting into the peak months of August through October for hurricane development, and we anticipate that more storms are on the way,” said NOAA Administrator Rick Spinrad, Ph.D. “NOAA stands ready to deliver timely and accurate forecasts and warnings to help communities prepare in advance of approaching storms.”

The updated 2022 Atlantic hurricane season probability and number of named storms. (NOAA)Download Image

NOAA’s update to the 2022 outlook — which covers the entire six-month hurricane season that ends on Nov. 30 — calls for 14-20 named storms (winds of 39 mph or greater), of which 6-10 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or greater). Of those, 3-5 could become major hurricanes (winds of 111 mph or greater). NOAA provides these ranges with a 70% confidence. 

So far, the season has seen three named storms and no hurricanes in the Atlantic Basin. An average hurricane season produces 14 named storms, of which seven become hurricanes, including three major hurricanes.

This outlook is for overall seasonal activity, and is not a landfall forecast. Landfalls are largely governed by short-term weather patterns that are currently only predictable within about one week of a storm potentially reaching a coastline.

There are several atmospheric and oceanic conditions that still favor an active hurricane season. This includes La Niña conditions, which are favored to remain in place for the rest of 2022 and could allow the ongoing high-activity era conditions to dominate, or slightly enhance hurricane activity. In addition to a continued La Niña, weaker tropical Atlantic trade winds, an active west African Monsoon and likely above-normal Atlantic sea-surface temperatures set the stage for an active hurricane season and are reflective of the ongoing high-activity era for Atlantic hurricanes.

The 2022 Atlantic tropical cyclone names selected by the World Meteorological Organization. (NOAA)Download Image

“Communities and families should prepare now for the remainder of what is still expected to be an active hurricane season,” said Ken Graham, director of the National Weather Service. “Ensure that you are ready to take action if a hurricane threatens your area by developing an evacuation plan and gathering hurricane supplies now, before a storm is bearing down on your community.”

Learn about NOAA’s hurricane science and forecasting expertise by viewing our Hurricane Season Media Resource Guide and stay tuned to the National Hurricane Center for the latest about tropical storm and hurricane activity in the Atlantic.

“Although it has been a relatively slow start to hurricane season, with no major storms developing in the Atlantic, this is not unusual  and we therefore cannot afford to let our guard down,” said FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell. “This is especially important as we enter peak hurricane season—the next Ida or Sandy could still be lying in wait. That’s why everyone should take proactive steps to get ready by downloading the FEMA app and visiting Ready.gov or Listo.gov for preparedness tips. And most importantly, make sure you understand your local risk and follow directions from your state and local officials.”

 

Media contact

Jasmine Blackwell, jasmine.blackwell@noaa.gov, (202) 841-9184

Weather hurricanes hurricane season 0

VoIP Hurricane Net Organizational Announcement - Appointment of WX9VOR-Debby Gray to Assistant Director of VoIP Hurricane Net Operations

VoIP SKYWARN Hurricane Net - Sat, 2018-07-28 12:47

Hello to all...

As Director of Operations for the VoIP Hurricane Net, I am pleased to announce that WX9VOR-Debby Gray, has accepted the position of Assistant Director of Operations for the VoIP Hurricane Net. Debby will take the place of N0UAM, Jim Sellars, who became a silent key in May of this year. She joins K2DCD-Dennis Dura as a second assistant within the VoIP Hurricane Net Management team.

Debby joined the VoIP Hurricane Net as a net control operator in 2016. In 2017, not only did she do multiple long net control shifts during that historic Atlantic hurricane season, she also recruited several new and experienced net controls from within her local area that supported the net tirelessly during both Hurricane Irma and Maria.

Debby worked professionally for 22 years as an IT Consultant, Educator and Mission Critical Support Specialist. It was during this time that she was involved in disaster planning and recovery through many natural and man-made disasters. Debby has been involved in recent years with amateur radio as the Amateur Radio Emergency Services (ARES) Emergency Coordinator (EC) for Kane County Illinois (IL) and the ARES DEC for Districts 3 & 4 in Northeast IL. She also volunteers as a Sergeant for the Naperville EMA Communications and Weather units, and is one of the senior members of the WX9LOT Ham Team supporting NWS Chicago and the NWS Chicago SKYWARN program.

The VoIP Hurricane Net Management Team is proud to have Debby within our team. She brings additional valuable experience into our team from a different part of the United States and has brought a set of resources to the net and will continue to support recruitment. Thanks to all for their continued support of the VoIP Hurricane Net!

73,Rob-KD1CY.
Director of Operations for the VoIP Hurricane Net

NWS-FWD Issues Hazardous Weather Outlook on Mon, 26 Sep 2016 02:58:00 CDT

Hazardous Weather Outlook - Mon, 2016-09-26 14:58
FLUS44 KFWD 261958 HWOFWD HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORT WORTH TX 258 PM CDT MON SEP 26 2016 TXZ091>095-100>107-115>123-129>135-141>148-156>162-174-175-271200- MONTAGUE-COOKE-GRAYSON-FANNIN-LAMAR-YOUNG-JACK-WISE-DENTON-COLLIN- HUNT-DELTA-HOPKINS-STEPHENS-PALO PINTO-PARKER-TARRANT-DALLAS- ROCKWALL-KAUFMAN-VAN ZANDT-RAINS-EASTLAND-ERATH-HOOD-SOMERVELL- JOHNSON-ELLIS-HENDERSON-COMANCHE-MILLS-HAMILTON-BOSQUE-HILL-NAVARRO- FREESTONE-ANDERSON-LAMPASAS-CORYELL-BELL-MCLENNAN-FALLS-LIMESTONE- LEON-MILAM-ROBERTSON- 258 PM CDT MON SEP 26 2016 THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR NORTH AND CENTRAL TEXAS. .DAY ONE...TONIGHT. NO HAZARDOUS WEATHER IS EXPECTED AT THIS TIME. .DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...TUESDAY THROUGH SUNDAY. NO HAZARDOUS WEATHER IS EXPECTED AT THIS TIME. .SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT... SPOTTER ACTIVATION IS NOT EXPECTED AT THIS TIME. $$ JLDUNN

NWS-FWD Issues Hazardous Weather Outlook on Mon, 26 Sep 2016 12:14:00 CDT

Hazardous Weather Outlook - Mon, 2016-09-26 12:14
FLUS44 KFWD 261714 AAA HWOFWD HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK...UPDATED NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORT WORTH TX 1214 PM CDT MON SEP 26 2016 TXZ091>095-100>107-115>123-129>135-141>148-156>162-174-175-271130- MONTAGUE-COOKE-GRAYSON-FANNIN-LAMAR-YOUNG-JACK-WISE-DENTON-COLLIN- HUNT-DELTA-HOPKINS-STEPHENS-PALO PINTO-PARKER-TARRANT-DALLAS- ROCKWALL-KAUFMAN-VAN ZANDT-RAINS-EASTLAND-ERATH-HOOD-SOMERVELL- JOHNSON-ELLIS-HENDERSON-COMANCHE-MILLS-HAMILTON-BOSQUE-HILL-NAVARRO- FREESTONE-ANDERSON-LAMPASAS-CORYELL-BELL-MCLENNAN-FALLS-LIMESTONE- LEON-MILAM-ROBERTSON- 1214 PM CDT MON SEP 26 2016 THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR NORTH AND CENTRAL TEXAS. .DAY ONE...THIS AFTERNOON AND TONIGHT. NO HAZARDOUS WEATHER IS EXPECTED AT THIS TIME. .DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...TUESDAY THROUGH SUNDAY. NO HAZARDOUS WEATHER IS EXPECTED AT THIS TIME. .SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT... SPOTTER ACTIVATION IS NOT EXPECTED AT THIS TIME. $$

NWS-FWD Issues Hazardous Weather Outlook on Sun, 25 Sep 2016 03:24:00 CDT

Hazardous Weather Outlook - Sun, 2016-09-25 15:24
FLUS44 KFWD 252024 HWOFWD HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORT WORTH TX 324 PM CDT SUN SEP 25 2016 TXZ091>095-100>107-115>123-129>135-141>148-156>162-174-175-261200- MONTAGUE-COOKE-GRAYSON-FANNIN-LAMAR-YOUNG-JACK-WISE-DENTON-COLLIN- HUNT-DELTA-HOPKINS-STEPHENS-PALO PINTO-PARKER-TARRANT-DALLAS- ROCKWALL-KAUFMAN-VAN ZANDT-RAINS-EASTLAND-ERATH-HOOD-SOMERVELL- JOHNSON-ELLIS-HENDERSON-COMANCHE-MILLS-HAMILTON-BOSQUE-HILL-NAVARRO- FREESTONE-ANDERSON-LAMPASAS-CORYELL-BELL-MCLENNAN-FALLS-LIMESTONE- LEON-MILAM-ROBERTSON- 324 PM CDT SUN SEP 25 2016 THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR NORTH AND CENTRAL TEXAS. .DAY ONE...TONIGHT. SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS WILL CONTINUE THROUGH TONIGHT. THE MAIN THREATS FROM ANY STRONGER THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE LIGHTNING...HEAVY RAINFALL AND GUSTY WINDS TO 35 MPH. MINOR FLOODING MAY OCCUR WHERE THUNDERSTORMS IMPACT ANY PARTICULAR AREA FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR MORE. .DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY. ISOLATED THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE POSSIBLE ON MONDAY ALONG AND SOUTH OF A LINE FROM GRAHAM TO DFW TO SULPHUR SPRINGS. PRIMARY HAZARDS ARE EXPECTED TO BE LIGHTNING STRIKES AND BRIEF HEAVY RAIN. .SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT... SPOTTER ACTIVATION IS NOT EXPECTED AT THIS TIME...HOWEVER REPORTS OF HEAVY RAIN AND FLOODING ARE APPRECIATED. $$ JLDUNN

NWS-FWD Issues Hazardous Weather Outlook on Sun, 25 Sep 2016 04:15:00 CDT

Hazardous Weather Outlook - Sun, 2016-09-25 04:15
FLUS44 KFWD 250915 HWOFWD HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORT WORTH TX 415 AM CDT SUN SEP 25 2016 TXZ091>095-100>107-115>123-129>135-141>148-156>162-174-175-261100- MONTAGUE-COOKE-GRAYSON-FANNIN-LAMAR-YOUNG-JACK-WISE-DENTON-COLLIN- HUNT-DELTA-HOPKINS-STEPHENS-PALO PINTO-PARKER-TARRANT-DALLAS- ROCKWALL-KAUFMAN-VAN ZANDT-RAINS-EASTLAND-ERATH-HOOD-SOMERVELL- JOHNSON-ELLIS-HENDERSON-COMANCHE-MILLS-HAMILTON-BOSQUE-HILL-NAVARRO- FREESTONE-ANDERSON-LAMPASAS-CORYELL-BELL-MCLENNAN-FALLS-LIMESTONE- LEON-MILAM-ROBERTSON- 415 AM CDT SUN SEP 25 2016 THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR NORTH AND CENTRAL TEXAS. .DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT. SCATTERED TO NUMEROUS THUNDERSTORMS WILL OCCUR THROUGH TONIGHT ACROSS MUCH OF THE AREA...WITH THE HIGHEST CHANCES EXPECTED ALONG AND WEST OF THE INTERSTATE 35 AND 35 WEST CORRIDORS. THE MAIN RISKS FROM ANY STRONGER THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE LIGHTNING...HEAVY RAINFALL AND GUSTY WINDS TO 35 MPH. THE HIGHEST RISK FOR FLOODING WILL BE ACROSS THE WESTERN HALF OF NORTH TEXAS...WHERE LIFT WILL BE THE STRONGEST. .DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY. THUNDERSTORMS WITH LOCALLY HEAVY RAINFALL WILL CONTINUE ACROSS THE ENTIRE AREA ON MONDAY BEHIND THE COLD FRONT. PRIMARY HAZARDS ARE EXPECTED TO BE LIGHTNING STRIKES AND FLOODING...ESPECIALLY ACROSS THOSE AREAS ALONG AND WEST OF HIGHWAY 281 WHERE SMALL STREAM FLOODING AND FLOODING OF TYPICAL LOW LYING AREAS CAN BE EXPECTED IN SOME LOCALES. WIDESPREAD FLASH FLOODING IS NOT EXPECTED. RAINFALL AMOUNTS BETWEEN 1 AND 3 INCHES WITH ISOLATED HIGHER AMOUNTS ARE EXPECTED WEST OF I-35/I-35W...WITH LESSER AMOUNTS FURTHER EAST. .SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT... SPOTTER ACTIVATION IS NOT EXPECTED AT THIS TIME...HOWEVER REPORTS OF HEAVY RAIN AND FLOODING ARE APPRECIATED. $$

NWS-FWD Issues Hazardous Weather Outlook on Sat, 24 Sep 2016 03:39:00 CDT

Hazardous Weather Outlook - Sat, 2016-09-24 15:39
FLUS44 KFWD 242039 HWOFWD HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORT WORTH TX 339 PM CDT SAT SEP 24 2016 TXZ091>095-100>107-115>123-129>135-141>148-156>162-174-175-251200- MONTAGUE-COOKE-GRAYSON-FANNIN-LAMAR-YOUNG-JACK-WISE-DENTON-COLLIN- HUNT-DELTA-HOPKINS-STEPHENS-PALO PINTO-PARKER-TARRANT-DALLAS- ROCKWALL-KAUFMAN-VAN ZANDT-RAINS-EASTLAND-ERATH-HOOD-SOMERVELL- JOHNSON-ELLIS-HENDERSON-COMANCHE-MILLS-HAMILTON-BOSQUE-HILL-NAVARRO- FREESTONE-ANDERSON-LAMPASAS-CORYELL-BELL-MCLENNAN-FALLS-LIMESTONE- LEON-MILAM-ROBERTSON- 339 PM CDT SAT SEP 24 2016 THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR NORTH AND CENTRAL TEXAS. .DAY ONE...TONIGHT. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS WILL MOVE INTO THE REGION FROM THE WEST LATE TONIGHT. WHILE THERE IS A RISK FOR SHOWERS AND STORMS ACROSS ALL OF NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS TONIGHT...THE GREATEST CHANCES WILL BE GENERALLY WEST OF I-35/35W. THE MAIN RISKS FROM STORMS TONIGHT WILL BE LIGHTNING AND LOCALLY HEAVY RAINFALL. .DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...SUNDAY THROUGH FRIDAY. THUNDERSTORMS WILL BECOME MORE WIDESPREAD SUNDAY THROUGH SUNDAY NIGHT WITH THE BEST CHANCES WEST OF I-35/35W AS A COLD FRONT MOVES THROUGH THE AREA. SEVERE WEATHER IS NOT EXPECTED. LOCALIZED HEAVY RAINFALL ACROSS THE WESTERN HALF THE AREA MAY PRODUCE SMALL STREAM FLOODING AND FLOODING OF TYPICAL LOW LYING AREAS. WIDESPREAD FLASH FLOODING IS NOT EXPECTED. RAINFALL AMOUNTS BETWEEN 1 AND 3 INCHES WITH ISOLATED HIGHER AMOUNTS ARE EXPECTED TO FALL MAINLY WEST OF I-35/I-35W...WITH LESSER AMOUNTS FURTHER EAST. LOW THUNDERSTORM CHANCES WILL CONTINUE MAINLY ACROSS CENTRAL TEXAS BEHIND THE COLD FRONT MONDAY NIGHT INTO TUESDAY BEFORE DRY CONDITIONS RETURN TUESDAY NIGHT AND BEYOND. .SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT... SPOTTER ACTIVATION IS NOT EXPECTED AT THIS TIME. $$

NWS-FWD Issues Hazardous Weather Outlook on Sat, 24 Sep 2016 04:47:00 CDT

Hazardous Weather Outlook - Sat, 2016-09-24 04:47
FLUS44 KFWD 240947 HWOFWD HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORT WORTH TX 447 AM CDT SAT SEP 24 2016 TXZ091>095-100>107-115>123-129>135-141>148-156>162-174-175-251100- MONTAGUE-COOKE-GRAYSON-FANNIN-LAMAR-YOUNG-JACK-WISE-DENTON-COLLIN- HUNT-DELTA-HOPKINS-STEPHENS-PALO PINTO-PARKER-TARRANT-DALLAS- ROCKWALL-KAUFMAN-VAN ZANDT-RAINS-EASTLAND-ERATH-HOOD-SOMERVELL- JOHNSON-ELLIS-HENDERSON-COMANCHE-MILLS-HAMILTON-BOSQUE-HILL-NAVARRO- FREESTONE-ANDERSON-LAMPASAS-CORYELL-BELL-MCLENNAN-FALLS-LIMESTONE- LEON-MILAM-ROBERTSON- 447 AM CDT SAT SEP 24 2016 THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR NORTH AND CENTRAL TEXAS. .DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT. SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE POSSIBLE LATER THIS MORNING NORTHWEST OF A LINE FROM GAINESVILLE TO MINERAL WELLS TO GOLDTHWAITE...THEN ACROSS THE ENTIRE AREA THIS AFTERNOON. SEVERE WEATHER IS NOT EXPECTED. THE PRIMARY HAZARD WITH THE STRONGER ACTIVITY WILL BE GUSTY WINDS AND LIGHTNING. .DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...SUNDAY THROUGH FRIDAY. THUNDERSTORMS WILL BECOME MORE WIDESPREAD WEST OF INTERSTATE 35 AND 35W SUNDAY MORNING...THEN ACROSS MUCH OF THE AREA SUNDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH MONDAY MORNING...AS A COLD FRONT MOVES THROUGH THE AREA. SEVERE WEATHER IS NOT EXPECTED. LOCALIZED HEAVY RAINFALL ACROSS THE WESTERN HALF THE AREA MAY PRODUCE SMALL STREAM FLOODING AND FLOODING OF TYPICAL LOW LYING AREAS AT TIMES. WIDESPREAD FLASH FLOODING IS NOT EXPECTED. RAINFALL AMOUNTS BETWEEN 1 AND 3 INCHES WITH ISOLATED HIGHER AMOUNTS ARE EXPECTED TO FALL MAINLY WEST OF I-35/I-35W...WITH LESSER AMOUNTS FURTHER EAST. LOW THUNDERSTORM CHANCES WILL CONTINUE MAINLY ACROSS CENTRAL TEXAS BEHIND THE COLD FRONT MONDAY NIGHT INTO TUESDAY BEFORE DRY CONDITIONS RETURN TUESDAY NIGHT AND BEYOND. .SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT... SPOTTER ACTIVATION IS NOT EXPECTED AT THIS TIME. $$
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